An Open Letter to Sam Pepper

lacigreen:

Hi Sam!

Thanks for taking the time to read this letter. As fellow YouTubers, we have much respect for others who put so much hard work into building their channel. It’s not easy, and you should be proud! That said, we’ve noticed that in your success, there has been a lack of respect in…

importantbirds:


Grand INDIGNACE from smallen birb

HOW DARE creat the cave with a Hande??  How produce the SMALLEN CAV

importantbirds:

Grand INDIGNACE from smallen birb

HOW DARE creat the cave with a Hande??  How produce the SMALLEN CAV

(Source: myloish, via best-of-tumblr)

(Source: dotwork-tattoo, via weadus)

pressing:

yeaaah

pressing:

yeaaah

(via weadus)

With the recent build-up to Swift’s upcoming album 1989, the question on everyone’s mind seems to be, “Who is the (un)lucky guy now?” In her Rolling Stone cover interview, Swift revealed a plot twist that nobody expected: She was going to be dedicating her next revenge song, “Bad Blood,” to a woman.

“She did something so horrible,” she said, “I was like, ‘Oh, we’re just straight-up enemies.’ And it wasn’t even about a guy! It had to do with business.”

This has led to speculation on the identity of the woman who got on Swift’s bad side — Katy Perry and Selena Gomez have been thrown around, and everyone is getting in on figuring out who crossed the line.

But there’s a problem: The whole thing seems very contrived. And it’s contrived around a horribly outdated image of what it means to be a woman. The most troubling part is not that Swift turned this into a PR stunt — a kind of “you do you, Taylor” — but that she’s feeding into the public’s obsession with pitting women against each other.

art-of-cg-girls:

Prayers of mother nature by mrNepa

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mountstar:

Types of matter

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